A bit about us

We’re a recruitment company, but we don’t act like one.

The digital, social and online media sector is where we come into our own, across both permanent and freelance roles.

We provide you with excellent people to help make your goals a reality, operating in London, New York and Los Angeles.

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What we’re best at

Whatever you’re looking for, we’re working with

Partnerships managers

Social media companies

Production houses

Post-production houses

Creative heads

Account Managers

Salespeople

Communications teams

Some of our numbers

We’ve been really busy since our launch in Feb ‘17…

London

150+ placements

New York

15+ placements

Los Angeles

10+ placements

Partners

Jungle
Leyton
Twisted
Gorkana
Kantar
Upslide
Vuelio
Lovegunn
WPP
Ambie
Funding options
Yoo

Small, but powerful

Dom West Dom West

Dom West

Founder & CEO

Friend first, boss second, probably an entertainer third

Rob Hedges Rob Hedges

Rob Hedges

Co-Founder & Lead Consultant

Not as tall as you think

Jack Simmons Jack Simmons

Jack Simmons

Consultant

“I solemnly swear that I am up to no good”

Flora McCluskey Flora McCluskey

Flora McCluskey

Consultant

I get extra hot at Nandos

Jack Ryan Jack Ryan

Jack Ryan

Freelance Consultant

I fought a hippo and the hippo won

Victoria Beardsworth Victoria Beardsworth

Victoria Beardsworth

Research Consultant

Name a bone, I’ve broken it

Let us do the work

Partner briefing

We spend time understanding exactly what you’re looking for.

Search starts

Time for us to find the right candidate!

Phone screening & face-to-face interview

This is imperative to ensure we’re talking to the best people.

Recommend the best

We’ll send over those who fit the bill.

Partner interviews

Over to you.

Candidate accepts

Congratulations!

Insights

10 jobs that haven't been invented yet

10 jobs that haven't been invented yet

Date: 16 November 2017

In this modern world in which we find ourselves, the pace of life will only get faster. As our technological...

Recruitment in the digital age: Hiring the perfect candidate

Recruitment in the digital age: Hiring the perfect candidate

Date: 12 November 2017

The digital age has provided countless advantages to anyone searching for the perfect candidate. Email has provided an alternative to...

The changing face of social media

The changing face of social media

Date: 10 November 2017

Social media is a pervasive force in our lives. It is our lunch hour, our 15-minute break, our post-alarm browse...

The changing face of social media

Date: 10 November 2017

Social media is a pervasive force in our lives. It is our lunch hour, our 15-minute break, our post-alarm browse and our goodnight scroll. Like it or lump it, it provides a sense of connection that traditional media simply can’t replicate. However, like public opinion on Kevin Spacey, it is changing.

In the same way that Netflix has challenged television, social media platforms are now looking to challenge Netflix. With huge investment in longer formats, it won’t be long before you’re binging on your favourite series via social media. (Facebook and chill?)

Meanwhile, companies’ spend on digital marketing is soaring - with one recent study even suggesting that television advertising is 90 per cent too expensive. As businesses want their brand mark on sharable content, the distinction between advertising and entertainment is becoming ever more blurred. While traditionalists may see this as a bad thing, future generations are expected to harbour far less animosity for advertising as a result.

Speaking of animosity, love-it-or-hate-it app Snapchat has created and controlled its own corner of the market - temporary media. While imitators haven’t seen much success so far, temporary media fulfils a purpose and appeals to young people who want instant gratification rather than to keep and catalogue their communications. As such, we can expect to see more of it, especially considering people’s addiction to Snapchat. After a short outage, a millennial recently tweeted: “Been signed off from my Snapchat for about 20 minutes and I actually think I might cry.”

Part of the reason people become so attached to these platforms is the sense of familiarity and their ease of use. In fact, many sites are trying to replicate the look and feel of apps like Instagram. This Apple-borne sleekness and simplification is a trend which is set to continue as companies focus on user experience.

With tailormade timelines, Facebook has been using information to provide a customised experience to fit your interests. It’s this idea of giving people what they want that has seen a huge increase in video on the platform. More easily digestible than articles, video has become a cornerstone of the Facebook experience.

However, this degree of personalisation has led to an “echo chamber” effect whereby people only see content that they like. The amount of confusion following last year’s US election suggests that we can be somewhat blinkered by consuming news and information through social media.

That said, social media has also been praised for bringing people together. Traditionally, there were magazines for women and magazines for men. However, as a collectively created hub of sharable and relatable content, it has been credited with helping women to understand men and men to understand women. And if that’s not an achievement, I don’t know what is.

The changing face of social media

Recruitment in the digital age: Hiring the perfect candidate

Date: 12 November 2017

The digital age has provided countless advantages to anyone searching for the perfect candidate. Email has provided an alternative to the infamous cold call and social media has provided an alternative to the now-infamous unsolicited email.

However, according to a study by LinkedIn, 85 per cent of potential candidates do want to hear from you. Only 15 per cent of people are ‘super passive’ - meaning they are not interested in hearing about new roles. As such, the vast majority of those you contact are ‘passive candidates’. While not actively looking, they are happy to hear about alternative roles. It’s your job to convert them into an opportunity.

Research firm Aberdeen Group found that 73 per cent of people aged 18 to 34 found their last job on social media. Furthermore, according to Jobvite, those who use social media to find candidates saw a 49 per cent improvement in candidate quality.

With thousands of career-based groups to source from, social media is an excellent place to find people. But one should bear in mind that different platforms require a different tone. That said, you should always aim to be professional yet personable, while presenting the opportunity in the most intriguing way possible. Don’t give away all the information at once - creating a ‘curiosity gap’ will improve your response rate.

It’s also worth remembering that if you’re looking at their social media, they’re probably looking at yours! Needless to say, any company’s social presence should be established and carefully maintained.

Meanwhile, data analytics is becoming more advanced and while there are currently thousands of different tools available, there are constantly new tools to help us find the right person. Accordingly, you should always ensure that your technology is improving rather than disrupting the user experience. If you have an onboarding portal, for instance, this needs to make candidates’ lives easier rather than harder.

Always test your tech and put yourself in a candidate’s shoes throughout the process, particularly if there are online tasks to complete. Lastly, the shelflife of information is becoming increasingly short. So keep yourself in the loop and, most importantly, expect change!

Recruitment in the digital age: Hiring the perfect candidate

10 jobs that haven't been invented yet

Date: 16 November 2017

In this modern world in which we find ourselves, the pace of life will only get faster. As our technological expertise allows further advancements to happen more quickly, we’re accelerating up that exponential curve at an alarming speed.

It’s no surprise then that the job market is also set to change. In fact, computer giants Dell predict that 85 percent of jobs that will exist in 2030 haven’t been invented yet. But let’s be honest, we might have destroyed the whole universe by then. So let’s take a look at 10 jobs that will exist in 10 years’ time, but haven’t been invented yet.

Personality consultant

Why do Jack’s Instagram photos get so many more likes than mine? Why do my Facebook posts get such low engagement? It all comes down to personality - and a personality consultant will enable you to optimise your digital presence to gain as many likes, friends and followers as possible.

Drone logistics manager

Train networks employ scores of logistics experts to ensure - or at least try to ensure - that everything runs on time and that trains don’t crash into each other. With drones set to take over the skies, airspace is going to get pretty busy. However, to avoid some sort of aerial armageddon, drone logistics managers will ensure that the ominous buzzing keeps its distance (and that your limbs stay un-severed).

Telesurgeon

Telesurgery will allow a surgeon to perform an operation remotely, using robotic arms, a master controller and a sensory system that provides feedback to the operator. While this is technically already being practised, the global disparity in surgical knowhow is expected to see telesurgery become far more prevalent. Before long, someone could be performing surgery on you from a different country.

Actualisation consultant

The marriage of virtual reality and computer animated design means that no longer will we have to use our imaginations. When designing your home, wouldn’t it be easier to walk around inside it and see how that feature wall looks from different angles? (After all, why play The Sims when you can be one?) However, like buying a dress on eBay, reality doesn’t always match up to expectations. That’s where actualisation consultants will step in - to ensure that your finished product is as close to its virtual counterpart as possible.

Feline relationship counsellor

As society gets ever more brainwashed by our furry captors, people will pay good money to try and understand them. However, cold and unknowable, cats will never like humans. This infinite loop has already created a sizable industry of cat whisperers and pet psychologists. But what if you and your cat have fallen out? Cue: the feline relationship counsellor. Dream job of crazy cat ladies and failed vets, it’s a career to mark the modern age.

Digital locksmith

To the dismay of babies everywhere, keys will cease to exist in the future. These antiquated bits of metal are already somewhat anachronistic when you consider that we’ve condensed the sum of human knowledge into an oblong of circuitry you can hold in your hand. As such, digital locks will take over. But unfortunately, this doesn’t mean you’ll stop getting locked out of your house. A specialist with the right knowledge, the right equipment and a subtle but persistent smirk will still have to come and let you in.

End of life therapist

As the average human lifespan increases, so will the period of our lives when we feel like we’re on the brink of death. This time can be spent playing bridge and being nostalgic over Snapchat. However, you can also spend this time consulting your end of life therapist, who will provide sensitive but practical planning prior to your eventual demise.

Head of happiness

Joy will be in short supply in the future. Nuclear wars, water shortages and the Kardashians’ ascent to the Oval Office will all give cause for concern. That’s why every workplace will have a head of happiness. Imagine a mediaeval jester who is also an agony aunt. What a time to be alive.

Canine relationship counsellor

You didn’t think you could fall out with man’s best friend too? The pet industry is already worth an estimated $70bn in the United States alone. If you don’t think that will soon translate into a canine relationship counsellor explaining that Buster is mad at you because you stepped on his tail two weeks ago, you’d be wrong.

Food engineer

As we look towards genetically modified crops and lab-grown meat, so too will we look to 3D printing our food. Apples the shape of bananas. Chicken wings the size of steaks. These fads will all fade. But food engineers will bring them to life.

While we can’t guarantee that we have any ‘head of happiness’ positions going, we have some very exciting roles available across the spectrum of digital media. Get in touch with us at hello@thenewguys.co.uk or to find out more.

10 jobs that haven't been invented yet
The changing face of social media

The changing face of social media

Social media is a pervasive force in our lives. It...

Recruitment in the digital age: Hiring the perfect candidate

Recruitment in the digital age: Hiring the perfect candidate

The digital age has provided countless advantages to anyone searching...

10 jobs that haven't been invented yet

10 jobs that haven't been invented yet

In this modern world in which we find ourselves, the...

Roles

Commercial

  • Business Development Manager
  • Senior Business Development Manager
  • Sales Manager
  • Sales Executive
  • Partnership Manager
  • Partnerships Executive
  • Account Manager
  • Account Executive

Creative

  • Junior Creative
  • Creative
  • Senior Creative
  • Creative Director

Production

  • Runner
  • Editor
  • Producer
  • Post-Production Manager
  • Production Manager
  • Head of Production

Social Media

  • Social Media Executive
  • Social Media Manager
  • Paid Social Executive
  • Paid Social Manager
  • Social Account Manager

Communications & Marketing

  • Communications Executive
  • Communications Manager
  • Head of Communications
  • Marketing Executive
  • Marketing Manager
  • Head of Marketing

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